Breeding biology and long-term population dynamics of the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca in Skibotn, Northern Norway
“Mummified” Pied Flycatcher nestling (age about 10 days) starved to death in Skibotn in the warm and dry summer of 1988.  Photo: Antero Järvinen.
pdf

Keywords

Key words: Pied Flycatcher, Northern Norway, breeding biology, population dynamics, long-term study

How to Cite

Järvinen, A. (2020). Breeding biology and long-term population dynamics of the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca in Skibotn, Northern Norway. Ornis Norvegica, 43, 17-27. https://doi.org/10.15845/on.v43i0.2977

Abstract

Abstract. The breeding biology and population dynamics of the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca in pine, mixed and deciduous forests in Skibotn, Northern Norway (69°20’N, 20°20’E), was studied during 33 years (1987–2019; in total 1775 completed first clutches). It was a period during which summer temperatures remained relatively stable, but late spring (May) temperatures tended to become warmer. The number of breeding pairs declined over the study period but varied less than in populations living in more harsh subalpine environments. In spite of the northern location, females started to lay eggs in a relatively late phenological phase of the environment and in relatively warm weather. The date of birch leafing and the date of egg-laying advanced during the study period, and they correlated with each other. Mean clutch size was 6.4 eggs, and mean number of fledglings/nest 4.6. Date of egg-laying was earlier and clutch size larger in deciduous forests than in pine and mixed forests, but this did not translate into better fledgling productivity. The main causes of nesting failure were predation by small mustelids and starvation in warm and dry summers. However, in the long run the population seemed to be able to maintain itself without immigration, i.e., act as a source population. The possibility that during warm climate periods of the past, breeding biology and population dynamics of Pied Flycatchers over large geographical areas might have resembled those in Skibotn is discussed.

https://doi.org/10.15845/on.v43i0.2977
pdf

Copyright (c) 2020 Antero Järvinen

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Articles published prior to September 2020 are subject to the following terms: https://boap.uib.no/index.php/ornis/copyright

Articles submitted from September 2020 are subject to the following terms:
Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 4.0 that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.

Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.

Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work.

Bergen Open Access Publishing