Thomas Middleton’s Legal Duel: A Cognitive Approach
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Keywords

Thomas Middelton
The Phoenix
Duel
Jacobean
metaphor
legal language
political language

How to Cite

Flattun, J.-W. “Thomas Middleton’s Legal Duel: A Cognitive Approach”. Early Modern Culture Online, Vol. 2, no. 1, Feb. 2018, doi:10.15845/emco.v2i1.1279.

Abstract

This article explores the Duel Scene (Scene 9, 99-277 (II.iii)) in Thomas Middleton's play The Phoenix (1607) in light of cognitive metephor theory. In reading this scene alongside the cultural and social changes in Elizabethan and Jacobean legal discourse, the mutual exchange of influence to both legal and political language and to drama and the theatre. The specific use of metaphoric blended spaces opens up for a combined linguistic and historical analysis.
https://doi.org/10.15845/emco.v2i1.1279
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Copyright (c) 2011 John-Wilhelm Flattun

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