Firekeepers
FILM

Keywords

Sami People
joik
indigenous people
music
Sapmi

How to Cite

Ragazzi, R. (2019). Firekeepers. Journal of Anthropological Films, 3(1), e2700. https://doi.org/10.15845/jaf.v3i1.2700

Abstract

Sápmi is the term of the imagined nation of the Saami people, covering a territory that goes across Norway, Sweden, Finland and Northern Russia. The joik is the specific form of Saami chanting. It coveys lyrics, melody and throat singing techniques, with a high level of abstraction in rendering the relation to people, natural sites, places, animals and events,  that we attempted to understand contextually and historically.

The cultural complexity emerging in this multivocal and multisited project shows the embodiment of verbal recollections, gestures, conversations, lyrics, chants, improvisations, outbursts and secretive features of the Saami chanting endeavor.  Among the socio-political issues that the film addressed is the poignant reality of fading away languages: Southern Saami is today spoken by less than 500 speakers in Norway. 

 

https://doi.org/10.15845/jaf.v3i1.2700
FILM

Copyright (c) 2019 Rossella Ragazzi

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