Eliamani's Homestead
FILM

Supplementary Files

Review 1
Review 2
Response to reviewers

Keywords

stereotypes
reflexivity
observer paradox
cultural tourism
visual anthropology

How to Cite

Wijngaarden, V. (2019). Eliamani’s Homestead. Journal of Anthropological Films, 3(1), e1488. https://doi.org/10.15845/jaf.v3i1.1488

Abstract

'Eliamani's Homestead' was shot as a result of long-term anthropological research in Tanzania and the translations were created in close cooperation with the Maasai research participants. Originally recorded for research purposes for a project on the relationship between images of and interactions with ‘the other’, the 20-minute single-shot includes jerky camera movements, but was left uncut and without voiceover in order to give the viewer a real-time experience of 'being there'. Within anthropology, the documentary invites to reflect on parallels between anthropology and tourism, and spurs debates regarding reflexivity. It addresses elements of the 'observer paradox' through the almost complete invisibility of the researcher’s camera, which stands in stark contrast with the obtrusive tourist cameras. That is, until Eliamani looks straight into the lens and dismissively comments upon the researcher’s camera too, making researcher and the documentary’s public part of the voyeuristic 'problem' as well. Outside anthropology, it invokes debates about how we see and interact with 'the other' in (cultural) tourism as well as in wider contexts. It thus addresses the question whether and how audiovisual data segments could be used to share anthropological knowledge inside and outside the discipline and academia.

https://doi.org/10.15845/jaf.v3i1.1488
FILM

Copyright (c) 2019 Vanessa Wijngaarden

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Authors who publish with this journal agree to the following terms:

Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License that allows others to share and redistribute the work, but not for commercial purposes or in modified forms, with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.

Bergen Open Access Publishing